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Archive for April 5th, 2010

knowing has two poles

“Knowing has two poles, and they are always poles apart: carnal knowing, the laying on of hands, the hanging of the fact by head or heels, the measurement of mass and motion, the calibration of brutal blows, the counting of supplies; and spiritual knowing, invisibly felt by the inside self, who is but a fought-over field of distraction, a stage where we recite the monotonous monologue that is our life, a knowing governed by internal tides, by intimations, motives, resolutions, by temptations, secrecy, shame, and pride.
William Grass The Art of Self

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authenticity

” It is strange, the desire to show off or to be somebody. It seems so impossibly difficult to be simple, to be what you are, and not pretend. To be what you are is in itself very arduous without trying to become something, which is not difficult. You can always pretend, put on a mask, but to be what you are is an extremely complex affair; because you are always changing; you are never the same and each moment reveals a new facet, a new depth, a new surface. You can’t be all this at one moment for each moment brings its own change. So if you are intelligent, you give up being anything.”
– J. Krishnamurti

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“Fundamentally, our experience as experienced is not different from the Zen master’s. Where we differ is that we place a particular kind of conceptual overlay onto that experience and then proceed to make an emotional investment in that overlay, taking it to be “real” in and of itself rather than to be an “expression” of the “occasion” in which we think or talk about the given experience. In a sense, we have a double layered description:

First, there is the prereflective, not yet conceptualized, experience – what we all share, Zen master and the rest of us alike.

Second, there is the expression or characterization of any experience within a particular situation or occasion.

If the speaker brings no personal, egotistic delusions into this expression, the occasion speaks for itself, the total situation alone determines what is said or done. Thus, in the case of the Zen master, what-is-said is simply what-is. In the case of the deluded person, however, the “what-is” includes his excess conceptual baggage with its affective components, the deluded ideas about the nature of “self,” “thing,” “time,” and so on that constitute the person’s own particular distortion of what actually is.

The wisdom of Enlightenment is inherent in every one of us. It is because of the delusion under which our mind works that we fail to realize it ourselves, and that we have to seek the advice and the guidance of Enlightened ones before we can know our own Essence of Mind. You should know that so far as Buddha-nature is concerned there is no difference in an Enlightened person and an ignorant one. What makes the difference is one realizes it, while the other is ignorant of it.”

Dogen Zenji Enlightenment: Can you do it?

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Kahlil Gibran

AND a woman spoke, saying, Tell us of Pain.

And he said:

Your pain is the breaking of the shell
that encloses your understanding.

Even as the stone of the fruit must break,that its
heart may stand in the sun, so must you know pain.

And could you keep your heart in wonder
at the daily miracles of your life, your pain
would not seem less wondrous than your joy;

And you would accept the seasons of your
heart, even as you have always accepted
the seasons that pass over your fields.

And you would watch with serenity
through the winters of your grief.

Much of your pain is self-chosen.

It is the bitter potion by which the
physician within you heals your sick self.

Therefore trust the physician, and drink
his remedy in silence and tranquillity:

For his hand, though heavy and hard, is guided
by the tender hand of the Unseen,
And the cup he brings, though it burn your lips,
has been fashioned of the clay which the Potter
has moistened with His own sacred tears.

:- a poem by Kahlil Gibran from “The Prophet”

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